Obliteration Never Looked So Divine


Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates for a Psycho promotional still.

Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates for a Psycho promotional still.

Source justinripley


Andy Warhol - In the future everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes

Source moonchild30


It’s far less important to me to be liked these days than to be understood.

Source mtthitt


I may be wrong, I may be very wrong. Because sometimes, the way he looks at me? That sweet boy from the beach, man of my dreams, father of my child? I catch him looking at me with those watchful eyes, the eyes of an insect, pure calculation, and I think: This man might kill me. - Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn

Source dannyboyle


The 13 Most Common Errors on a Novel's First Page

yeahwriters:

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

This is like the Story Beginnings Bible.


Have you ever been alone on this train? When was the last time you were alone? You can’t remember, can you? So please do take your time.

Source gilbertnorrell


Honey, I am seven fox years old. My father died at seven and a half. I don’t want to live in a hole anymore, and I’m going to do something about it.

Source spikejonzze


You know, I don’t get it. Why would anyone paint a picture of a door, over and over again, like, dozens of times?
But it wasn’t the same.

Yeah, it was.
It was the same subject, but it was different every time. The light was different, her mood was different. She saw something new every time she painted it.
And that’s not psycho to you?
/…/ 

That door was her home and she loved it. To me, that’s about making that feeling last.

Source jessepinkmanist



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